Recent additions to Systemopedia.org

I recently added the following to systemopedia.org:

Citizen Assemblies

citizens’ assembly is a body formed from the citizens of a state to deliberate on an issue or issues of national importance. The membership of a citizens’ assembly is randomly selected, as in other forms of sortition.

The purpose is to employ a cross-section of the public to study the options available to the state on certain questions and to propose answers to these questions through rational and reasoned discussion and the use of various methods of inquiry such as directly questioning experts. In many cases, the state will require these proposals to be accepted by the general public through a referendum before becoming law.

The citizens’ assembly aims to reinstall trust in the political process by taking direct ownership of decision-making.[1] To that end, citizens’ assemblies intend to remedy the “divergence of interests” that arises between elected representatives and the electorate, as well as “a lack in deliberation in legislatures.”[2]

The use of citizens’ assemblies to reach decisions in this way is related to the traditions of deliberative democracy and popular sovereignty in political theory. While these traditions stretch back to origins in ancient Athenian democracy, they have become newly relevant both to theorists and politicians as part of a deliberative turn in democratic theory. From the 1980s to the early 1990s, this deliberative turn began, shifting from the predominant theoretical framework of participatory democracy toward deliberative democracy, initially in the work of Jane Mansbridge and Joseph M. Bessette.[3] Since, citizens’ assemblies have been used in countries such as Canada and the Netherlands to deliberate on reform of the system used to elect politicians in those countries.

Ordinarily, citizens’ assemblies are state initiatives. However, there are also examples of independent citizens’ assemblies, such as the ongoing Le G1000 in Belgium or the 2011 We the Citizens initiative in Ireland.

The Note: Biden blasts Trump — though not his Republican Party

By RICK KLEINandMARYALICE PARKS Jun 12, 2019, 5:59 AM ET
https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/note-biden-blasts-trump-republican-party/story?id=63638753

…Former Vice President Joe Biden has now unleashed a torrent of criticism at President Donald Trump. In an Iowa trip that wraps up on Wednesday, Biden has called the president an “existential threat to America” who is “shredding” the nation’s values and “damaging” the country.

But he was virtually silent on the Republican Party at large. Earlier in the week, Biden expressed confidence that “you’re going to begin to see things change” with Republicans when Trump is off the national stage.

“These folks know better,” he said at a fundraiser.

And on Tuesday, he pushed back at the notion that you need wholesale change in the type of people who lead.

“Guess what?” he told reporters after a campaign event in Iowa. “The system worked pretty damn well. It’s called the Constitution. It says you have to get a consensus to get anything done.”

Suffice it to say that such confidence in the GOP reverting to pre-Trump form is not shared widely among Biden’s rivals. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee tweeted, “What’s next? Expecting Toronto fans to cheer for the Warriors in Game 6?”

This may be an example of Biden, with his proud history of cutting bipartisan deals, staying true to himself. …

When They See Us | Netflix Official Site

Five teens from Harlem become trapped in a nightmare when they’re falsely accused of a brutal attack in Central Park. … Academy Award nominee Ava DuVernay (“Selma,” “13th”) directs this powerful retelling of a case that gripped the nation. … In the spring of 1989, five boys of color …

Excellent, timely, extremely important. Highly rated by audiences.

https://www.netflix.com/title/80200549

This changed how I think about love (with Alison Gopnik)

The Ezra Klein Show
https://open.spotify.com/episode/5CYXoW6x3Yuu15ObEuIlgW
JUN 13

Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and philosophy at the University of California Berkeley. She’s published more than 100 journal articles and half a dozen books. She runs a cognitive development and learning lab where she studies how young children come to understand the world around them, and she’s built on that research to do work in AI, to understand how adults form bonds with both children and each other, and to examine what creativity is and how we can nurture it in ourselves and — more importantly — each other.I worry when I post these podcasts with experts in child development that people without children will pass them by. So let me be direct: Listen to this one. I didn’t have Gopnik on the show to talk about children; I had her on the show to talk about human beings. What makes us feel love for each other. How we can best care for each other. How our minds really work in the formative, earliest days, and what we lose as we get older. The role community is meant to play in our lives.There is more great stuff in this conversation than I can write in an intro. She’s changed my thinking on not just parenting but friendships, marriage, and schooling. Some of these are ideas you could build a life around. This is worth your time.Book recommendations:A Treatise of Human Natureby David HumeAlice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis CarrollThe works of Jean Piaget