Male Trouble

Male Trouble
By Arlie Russell Hochschild
New York Review of Books
OCTOBER 11, 2018 ISSUE

A review of:

The Boy Crisis: Why Our Boys Are Struggling and What We Can Do About It
by Warren Farrell and John Gray
BenBella, 493 pp., $25.95

Healing from Hate: How Young Men Get Into—and Out of—Violent Extremism
by Michael Kimmel
University of California Press, 263 pp., $29.95

White American Youth: My Descent into America’s Most Violent Hate Movement—and How I Got Out
by Christian Picciolini
Hachette, 275 pp., $15.99 (paper)

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My letter:

Dear Arlie

I very much appreciate your important and insightful “Male Trouble” in the New York Review of Books.

In addition to the “roots” you address in the section on solutions, I recommend more attention to cultural changes. Beyond making it “heroic to be a great dad,”  a new paradigm of modern humanity could replace Faludi’s “paradigm of modern masculinity.” The biological differences between men and women are relatively insignificant, so far as I can tell. Our shared humanity is key.

Moreover, we need to redefine the American Dream, or perhaps return to its original definition, which assumed a gradual accumulation of wealth. Widespread, rabid greed is a relatively new phenomenon. The drive to climb social ladders and look down on and dominate those below is deadly.

Americans for Humanity: A Declaration” aims to contribute to that kind of transformation. If you will, please consider signing it. (BTW, the other day, I sent you an email about it with a bad link. Sorry about that if you tried it.)

Carry it on,
Wade Lee Hudson

Imperial Exceptionalism

By Jackson Lears
New York Review of Books
February 7, 2019 issue

A review of:

Empire in Retreat: The Past, Present, and Future of the United States
by Victor Bulmer-Thomas
Yale University Press, 459 pp., $32.50
and
Republic in Peril: American Empire and the Liberal Tradition
by David C. Hendrickson
Oxford University Press, 287 pp., $34.95

To read, click here.

Irrational Politics

Human beings join tribes. This instinct is biological. Tribes assume moral superiority over and seek to dominate other tribes. Winning is primary. The price of victory is secondary. These battles produce strong emotions that distort reality.

When tribes join with other tribes into super-tribes, a threat to one tribe is a threat to every tribe. Life becomes more dangerous and irrational. Republicans and Democrats are super-tribes. They focus on winning the next election.

The development of these electoral super-tribes has undermined the ability of legislators to compromise, which is the heart of democracy. Legislators must compromise to address difficult problems, but increased polarization has made it more difficult. Tribalism is pulling the country ever deeper into a downward spiral of bitter gridlock.

Compromise is not always timely. Militant activism can help bring attention to pressing issues and build pressure for stronger improvements. But outside the electoral arena, on the left and the right, doctrinaire, victory-centric tribes have also formed super-tribes. They demonize opponents, resist all compromise, and disregard the consequences of their actions. The result is profound fragmentation.

The time has come for everyone to step back and engage in critical self-evaluation. Learning to overcome arrogant, hyper-competitive, domineering tribalism is essential in order to unite and transform this nation into a compassionate community.

Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity by Lilliana Mason analyzes Republicans and Democrats. Her book applies to other tribes as well.

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Mason argues:

A single vote can now indicate a person’s partisan preference as well as his or her religion, race, ethnicity, gender, neighborhood, and favorite grocery store. This is no longer a single social identity. Partisanship can now be thought of as a mega-identity.

Mason calls this dynamic “social polarization.” The convergence of multiple identities into one mega-identity leads to greater stereotyping, prejudice, and emotional volatility — and makes us “increasingly blind to our commonalities.”

READ MORE

Political Action: A Practical Guide to Movement Politics

New from NYRB Classics

Political Action
A Practical Guide to Movement Politics
Michael Walzer

Buy now

Written at one of the darkest moments of the Nixon administration, Political Action is as timely, intelligent, and useful today as it was then. With clarity, wisdom, and wit, Michael Walzer lays out the practical steps for keeping movement politics alive both in victory and defeat. Political Action addresses important questions such as:

  • What do people need to do when out of outrage or fear of looming disaster they come together to demand change?
  • What can and can’t be accomplished through electoral politics?
  • How can movements operate democratically?
  • What is effective leadership?

Both an indispensable resource for activists and a lasting call to action, Political Action is an inspiring book for our times.

 

“The idea of republishing this book came from some high school students in Los Angeles. They were part of a social justice group at their school, and most of the projects they were contemplating involved organizing of some kind. To help them think about that, their faculty adviser photocopied parts of Political Action and handed it out. ‘This is really good!’ they told him. ‘This is what we need.’ What the kids said next became the impetus for this new edition: ‘Why is there nothing like this?’”

– from the new introduction by Jon Wiener

“Walzer’s first political call to action resonates as much in today’s tense, precarious climate as it did when the author originally crafted it… An authoritative master plan for forming effective, influential citizen activism.”

– Kirkus Reviews

 

For a limited time, Political Action will be available at 30% off.

Joe Henry

Joe Henry (born December 2, 1960) is a great singer-songwriter and producer. He has released 13 studio albums and produced multiple recordings for other artists, including three Grammy Award-winning albums. This video begins a YouTube mix playlist.

 

Partisan Bias

From Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity by Lilliana Mason:

Democrats and Republicans also view objective economic conditions differently, depending on which party is in power. In the week before the 2016 election, 16 percent of Republicans and 61 percent of Democrats believed the US economy was getting better. In the week after the election, 49 percent of Republicans and 46 percent of Democrats believed the economy was improving….

p.3

 

Movies

I thought Vice was very good, but liked Fair Game – Director’s Cut on Netflix even more. It covers the same ground more powerfully.

Better yet is Get Me Roger Stone on Netflix. Very well done. I learned new details about his history.